Tag : genome

dna

Massive US Government Study To Offer Genetic Counseling

A US government study aims to sequence the genomes of one million volunteers as part of its new ”All of Us” project. A genetic-counselling company hired by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will work with participants to help them understand their results. Most of the participants are recruited from ethnic and socioeconomic groups that are typically under-represented in biomedical studies.

mosaic

Scientist Confirm That The Human Body Is A Mosaic Of Different Genomes

A new study has confirmed that the human body is, in fact, a complex mosaic made up of clusters of cells with different genomes. The largest such study to date compiles data from thousands of samples collected from about 500 people and 29 different types of tissue. Scientists say that “normal” human tissues are permeated with mutations and many cells in the body bear mutations that could contribute to cancer. These findings could help scientists better understand how cancer starts.

DNA

Scientists Squeeze Entire Yeast Genome into Just One Chromosome

Two separate research groups used CRISPR gene editing to fuse entire sets of brewer’s yeast chromosomes together, resulting in two strains with just one and two chromosomes. Surprisingly, the changes had little effect on most functions of the yeast. Their findings could be monumental to the study of chromosomes and why their numbers vary from species to species.

mice

Controversial CRISPR “Gene Drives” Tested in Mice

Researchers from the University of California tested gene-drive technology in mice. This controversial application of CRISPR, capable of altering the genomes of entire species, has been applied to mammals for the first time. Although the developed technology has a long way to go before being used for pest control in the wild, it could be useful in basic research.

mosquito malaria

Engineered Shrub Boosts Malaria Drug Artemisinin Yield

Researchers from China have modified an Artemisia annua genetic sequence to produce a higher level of a potent antimalarial compound, artemisinin. The group identified genes involved in making artemisinin in Artemisia annua and altered their activity to produce three times more drug than usual. Their work will help to meet the large global demand for artemisinin, which is also used to treat cancer, tuberculosis, and diabetes.